OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush described glue holding the Titan mini sub together ‘like peanut butter’

The CEO of OceanGate Expeditions, whose experimental submersible imploded on a visit to the wreckage of the Titanic, said the glue holding the vessel together was like ‘peanut butter’.

Stockton Rush, in a video posted to the company’s YouTube account years before his death and that of four passengers on board the Titan sub last month, described the glue holding the carbon-fibre submersible together ‘like peanut butter’ and thicker than Elmer’s glue.

The 2018 video showed his team fitting the structure together as the CEO described the process as ‘pretty simple’.

It appears that Rush – who was repeatedly waned about the safety of the Titan – was overseeing the team of engineers bounding the titanium ring and carbon-fiber hull for the sub.

The passengers and Rush, who was piloting the ill-fated sub, were all thought to be killed when the vessel imploded after it was unable to take the pressure of the deep ocean.

OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush described glue holding the Titan mini sub together ‘like peanut butter’

OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush described glue holding the Titan mini sub together ‘like peanut butter’

OceanGate CEO Stockton Rush was piloting the ill-fated sub when the Titan vessel imploded, killing all onboard 

OceanGate Expeditions CEO Stockton Rush is seen sitting inside the vessel in May. Rush was piloting the Titan submersible when it imploded near the wreckage of the Titanic last month

OceanGate Expeditions CEO Stockton Rush is seen sitting inside the vessel in May. Rush was piloting the Titan submersible when it imploded near the wreckage of the Titanic last month

OceanGate Expeditions CEO Stockton Rush is seen sitting inside the vessel in May. Rush was piloting the Titan submersible when it imploded near the wreckage of the Titanic last month

Earlier in the clip, Rush told the camera that the process is ‘pretty simple, but if we mess it up, there’s not a lot of room for recovery’.

Rush was repeatedly warned by experts that the design and build of the ship – including the glue and carbon-fiber hull – were highly dangerous when under the water pressure of the deep ocean.

David Lochridge, formerly OceanGate’s director of marine operations for the Titan project, wrote an engineering report in 2018 that said the craft under development needed more testing and passengers may be endangered when it reached ‘extreme depths,’ according to a lawsuit filed that year in U.S. District Court in Seattle.

OceanGate sued Lochridge that year, accusing him of breaching a non-disclosure agreement, and filed a counterclaim alleging that he was wrongfully fired for raising questions about testing and safety.

Lochridge said in the counterclaim that OceanGate, which charges up to $250,000 for a seat on the vessel, would ‘subject passengers to potential extreme danger in an experimental submersible’. He also said Titan was not equipped to reach depths of around 13,123 feet, where the Titanic wreck rests.

The case settled on undisclosed terms several months after it was filed.

Lochridge’s concerns revealed in the lawsuit primarily focused on the company’s decision to rely on sensitive acoustic monitoring – cracking or popping sounds made by the hull under pressure – to detect flaws, rather than a scan of the hull.

He said the company told him no equipment existed that could perform such a test on the 5-inch-thick (12.7-centimeter-thick) carbon-fiber hull.

Rush was repeatedly warned by experts that the design and build of the Titan sub was highly dangerous when under the water pressure of the deep ocean.

Rush was repeatedly warned by experts that the design and build of the Titan sub was highly dangerous when under the water pressure of the deep ocean.

Rush was repeatedly warned by experts that the design and build of the Titan sub was highly dangerous when under the water pressure of the deep ocean.

David Lochridge (pictured), formerly OceanGate's director of marine operations for the Titan project, wrote an engineering report in 2018 that said the craft under development needed more testing

David Lochridge (pictured), formerly OceanGate's director of marine operations for the Titan project, wrote an engineering report in 2018 that said the craft under development needed more testing

David Lochridge (pictured), formerly OceanGate’s director of marine operations for the Titan project, wrote an engineering report in 2018 that said the craft under development needed more testing 

‘This was problematic because this type of acoustic analysis would only show when a component is about to fail, often milliseconds before an implosion, and would not detect any existing flaws prior to putting pressure on to the hull,’ Lochridge’s counterclaim said.

Further, the craft was designed to reach depths of 4,000 meters (13,123 feet). But, according to Lochridge, the passenger viewport was only certified for depths of up to 1,300 meters (4,265 feet), and OceanGate would not pay for the manufacturer to build a viewport certified for 4,000 meters.

OceanGate’s choices would ‘subject passengers to potential extreme danger in an experimental submersible,’ the counterclaim said.

But the company said in its complaint that Lochridge ‘is not an engineer and was not hired or asked to perform engineering services on the Titan.’ 

OceanGate Chief Executive Stockton Rush (pictured) defended his company's approach to not put Titan through an independent inspection process

OceanGate Chief Executive Stockton Rush (pictured) defended his company's approach to not put Titan through an independent inspection process

OceanGate Chief Executive Stockton Rush (pictured) defended his company’s approach to not put Titan through an independent inspection process

File photo of inside the OceanGate Expeditions sub which went missing near the wreckage of the Titanic. All five were killed onboard

File photo of inside the OceanGate Expeditions sub which went missing near the wreckage of the Titanic. All five were killed onboard

File photo of inside the OceanGate Expeditions sub which went missing near the wreckage of the Titanic. All five were killed onboard

He was fired after refusing to accept assurances from OceanGate’s lead engineer that the acoustic monitoring and testing protocol was, in fact, better suited to detect any flaws than a scan would be, the complaint said.

In a 2018 court document, lawyers for the company also said Lochridge’s employment was terminated because he ‘could not accept’ their research and plans, including safety protocols. 

OceanGate also claimed Lochridge ‘desired to be fired’ and had shared confidential information with others and wiped a company hard drive. The company said he ‘refused to accept the voracity of information’ about safety from Titan’s lead engineer.

Source: | This article originally belongs to Dailymail.co.uk